Download Bio-Inspired and Nanoscale Integrated Computing by Mary Mehrnoosh Eshaghian-Wilner PDF

By Mary Mehrnoosh Eshaghian-Wilner

Brings the most recent advances in nanotechnology and biology to computing

This pioneering publication demonstrates how nanotechnology can create even quicker, denser computing architectures and algorithms. moreover, it attracts from the most recent advances in biology with a spotlight on bio-inspired computing on the nanoscale, bringing to gentle a number of new and cutting edge purposes similar to nanoscale implantable biomedical units and neural networks.

Bio-Inspired and Nanoscale built-in Computing positive factors a professional staff of interdisciplinary authors who provide readers the good thing about their very own breakthroughs in built-in computing in addition to a radical research and analyses of the literature. conscientiously edited, the booklet starts with an introductory bankruptcy delivering a basic evaluate of the sphere. It ends with a bankruptcy environment forth the typical subject matters that tie the chapters jointly in addition to a forecast of rising avenues of analysis.

one of the very important issues addressed within the booklet are modeling of nano units, quantum computing, quantum dot mobile automata, dielectrophoretic reconfigurable nano architectures, multilevel and three-d nanomagnetic recording, spin-wave architectures and algorithms, fault-tolerant nanocomputing, molecular computing, self-assembly of supramolecular nanostructures, DNA nanotechnology and computing, nanoscale DNA series matching, scientific nanorobotics, heterogeneous nanostructures for biomedical diagnostics, biomimetic cortical nanocircuits, bio-applications of carbon nanotubes, and nanoscale photo processing.

Readers in electric engineering, computing device technology, and computational biology will achieve new insights into how bio-inspired and nanoscale units can be utilized to layout the subsequent new release of superior built-in circuits.Content:
Chapter 1 An advent to Nanocomputing (pages 1–30): Elaine Ann Ebreo Cara, Stephen Chu, Dr. Mary Mehrnoosh Eshaghian?Wilner, Eric Mlinar, Dr. Alireza Nojeh, Fady Rofail, Michael M. Safaee, Shawn Singh, Daniel Wu and Chun Wing Yip
Chapter 2 Nanoscale units: purposes and Modeling (pages 31–65): Dr. Alireza Nojeh
Chapter three Quantum Computing (pages 67–109): Dr. John H. Reif
Chapter four Computing with Quantum?Dot mobile Automata (pages 111–153): Dr. Konrad Walus and Dr. Graham A. Jullien
Chapter five Dielectrophoretic Architectures (pages 155–173): Alexander D. Wissner?Gross
Chapter 6 Multilevel and Three?Dimensional Nanomagnetic Recording (pages 175–201): Dr. S. Khizroev, R. Chomko, Dr. I. Dumer and Dr. D. Litvinov
Chapter 7 Spin?Wave Architectures (pages 203–223): Dr. Mary Mehrnoosh Eshaghian?Wilner, Alex Khitun, Dr. Shiva Navab and Dr. Kang L. Wang
Chapter eight Parallel Computing with Spin Waves (pages 225–241): Dr. Mary Mehrnoosh Eshaghian?Wilner and Dr. Shiva Navab
Chapter nine Nanoscale general electronic Modules (pages 243–261): Dr. Shiva Navab
Chapter 10 Fault? and Defect?Tolerant Architectures for Nanocomputing (pages 263–293): Sumit Ahuja, Gaurav Singh, Debayan Bhaduri and Sandeep Shukla
Chapter eleven Molecular Computing: Integration of Molecules for Nanocomputing (pages 295–326): Dr. James M. journey and Dr. Lin Zhong
Chapter 12 Self?Assembly of Supramolecular Nanostructures: Ordered Arrays of steel Ions and Carbon Nanotubes (pages 327–348): Dr. Mario Ruben
Chapter thirteen DNA Nanotechnology and its organic functions (pages 349–375): Dr. John H. Reif and Dr. Thomas H. LaBean
Chapter 14 DNA series Matching at Nanoscale point (pages 377–389): Dr. Mary Mehrnoosh Eshaghian?Wilner, Ling Lau, Dr. Shiva Navab and David D. Shen
Chapter 15 Computational initiatives in clinical Nanorobotics (pages 391–428): Dr. Robert A. Freitas
Chapter sixteen Heterogeneous Nanostructures for Biomedical Diagnostics (pages 429–453): Dr. Hongyu Yu, Mahsa Rouhanizadeh, Lisong Ai and Tzung ok. Hsiai
Chapter 17 Biomimetic Cortical Nanocircuits (pages 455–482): Dr. Alice C. Parker, Aaron okay. Friesz and Ko?Chung Tseng
Chapter 18 Biomedical and Biomedicine purposes of CNTs (pages 483–514): Dr. Tulin Mangir
Chapter 19 Nanoscale picture Processing (pages 515–534): Dr. Mary Mehrnoosh Eshaghian?Wilner and Dr. Shiva Navab
Chapter 20 Concluding feedback at first of a brand new Computing period (pages 535–545): Varun Bhojwani, Stephen Chu, Dr. Mary Mehrnoosh Eshaghian?Wilner, Shawn Singh and Chun Wing Yip

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By Mary Mehrnoosh Eshaghian-Wilner

Brings the most recent advances in nanotechnology and biology to computing

This pioneering publication demonstrates how nanotechnology can create even quicker, denser computing architectures and algorithms. moreover, it attracts from the most recent advances in biology with a spotlight on bio-inspired computing on the nanoscale, bringing to gentle a number of new and cutting edge purposes similar to nanoscale implantable biomedical units and neural networks.

Bio-Inspired and Nanoscale built-in Computing positive factors a professional staff of interdisciplinary authors who provide readers the good thing about their very own breakthroughs in built-in computing in addition to a radical research and analyses of the literature. conscientiously edited, the booklet starts with an introductory bankruptcy delivering a basic evaluate of the sphere. It ends with a bankruptcy environment forth the typical subject matters that tie the chapters jointly in addition to a forecast of rising avenues of analysis.

one of the very important issues addressed within the booklet are modeling of nano units, quantum computing, quantum dot mobile automata, dielectrophoretic reconfigurable nano architectures, multilevel and three-d nanomagnetic recording, spin-wave architectures and algorithms, fault-tolerant nanocomputing, molecular computing, self-assembly of supramolecular nanostructures, DNA nanotechnology and computing, nanoscale DNA series matching, scientific nanorobotics, heterogeneous nanostructures for biomedical diagnostics, biomimetic cortical nanocircuits, bio-applications of carbon nanotubes, and nanoscale photo processing.

Readers in electric engineering, computing device technology, and computational biology will achieve new insights into how bio-inspired and nanoscale units can be utilized to layout the subsequent new release of superior built-in circuits.Content:
Chapter 1 An advent to Nanocomputing (pages 1–30): Elaine Ann Ebreo Cara, Stephen Chu, Dr. Mary Mehrnoosh Eshaghian?Wilner, Eric Mlinar, Dr. Alireza Nojeh, Fady Rofail, Michael M. Safaee, Shawn Singh, Daniel Wu and Chun Wing Yip
Chapter 2 Nanoscale units: purposes and Modeling (pages 31–65): Dr. Alireza Nojeh
Chapter three Quantum Computing (pages 67–109): Dr. John H. Reif
Chapter four Computing with Quantum?Dot mobile Automata (pages 111–153): Dr. Konrad Walus and Dr. Graham A. Jullien
Chapter five Dielectrophoretic Architectures (pages 155–173): Alexander D. Wissner?Gross
Chapter 6 Multilevel and Three?Dimensional Nanomagnetic Recording (pages 175–201): Dr. S. Khizroev, R. Chomko, Dr. I. Dumer and Dr. D. Litvinov
Chapter 7 Spin?Wave Architectures (pages 203–223): Dr. Mary Mehrnoosh Eshaghian?Wilner, Alex Khitun, Dr. Shiva Navab and Dr. Kang L. Wang
Chapter eight Parallel Computing with Spin Waves (pages 225–241): Dr. Mary Mehrnoosh Eshaghian?Wilner and Dr. Shiva Navab
Chapter nine Nanoscale general electronic Modules (pages 243–261): Dr. Shiva Navab
Chapter 10 Fault? and Defect?Tolerant Architectures for Nanocomputing (pages 263–293): Sumit Ahuja, Gaurav Singh, Debayan Bhaduri and Sandeep Shukla
Chapter eleven Molecular Computing: Integration of Molecules for Nanocomputing (pages 295–326): Dr. James M. journey and Dr. Lin Zhong
Chapter 12 Self?Assembly of Supramolecular Nanostructures: Ordered Arrays of steel Ions and Carbon Nanotubes (pages 327–348): Dr. Mario Ruben
Chapter thirteen DNA Nanotechnology and its organic functions (pages 349–375): Dr. John H. Reif and Dr. Thomas H. LaBean
Chapter 14 DNA series Matching at Nanoscale point (pages 377–389): Dr. Mary Mehrnoosh Eshaghian?Wilner, Ling Lau, Dr. Shiva Navab and David D. Shen
Chapter 15 Computational initiatives in clinical Nanorobotics (pages 391–428): Dr. Robert A. Freitas
Chapter sixteen Heterogeneous Nanostructures for Biomedical Diagnostics (pages 429–453): Dr. Hongyu Yu, Mahsa Rouhanizadeh, Lisong Ai and Tzung ok. Hsiai
Chapter 17 Biomimetic Cortical Nanocircuits (pages 455–482): Dr. Alice C. Parker, Aaron okay. Friesz and Ko?Chung Tseng
Chapter 18 Biomedical and Biomedicine purposes of CNTs (pages 483–514): Dr. Tulin Mangir
Chapter 19 Nanoscale picture Processing (pages 515–534): Dr. Mary Mehrnoosh Eshaghian?Wilner and Dr. Shiva Navab
Chapter 20 Concluding feedback at first of a brand new Computing period (pages 535–545): Varun Bhojwani, Stephen Chu, Dr. Mary Mehrnoosh Eshaghian?Wilner, Shawn Singh and Chun Wing Yip

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Sample text

In fact, atoms behave according to laws discovered much later than Sir Isaac Newton’s classical mechanics. The laws of quantum mechanics, developed mainly in the first half of the twentieth century, are rather nonintuitive for someone who is used to everyday phenomena with large objects, but they constitute the best description we have so far for the world of small particles such as atoms. Let us continue with the example of the book. When such a huge collection of atoms is put together, the overall behavior will be a statistical average of the behavior of the individual atoms, subject to external forces and the constraints that keep them together.

1. INTRODUCTION 33 such a large collection of atoms is put together, the general behavior of the ensemble in everyday life experiences does not directly reflect the atomistic nature of the system. , weight, dimensions, color, etc. You can also use the laws of classical physics, such as Newtonian mechanics, to describe its motion if a force is applied to it. In fact, atoms behave according to laws discovered much later than Sir Isaac Newton’s classical mechanics. The laws of quantum mechanics, developed mainly in the first half of the twentieth century, are rather nonintuitive for someone who is used to everyday phenomena with large objects, but they constitute the best description we have so far for the world of small particles such as atoms.

C. Lee, C. Kuo, D. Hisamoto, L. Chang, J. Kedzierski, E. Anderson, H. Takeuchi, Y. K. Choi, K. Asano, V. Subramanian, T. J. King, J. Bokor, and C. Hu. Sub 50-nm finFET: PMOS. Electron Devices Meeting, 1999. IEDM Technical Digest International: pp 67–70, 1999. 7. B. S. Doyle, S. Datta, M. Doczy, S. Hareland, B. Jin, J. Kavalieros, T. Linton, A. Murthy, R. Rios, and R. Chau. High performance fully depleted tri-gate CMOS transistors. IEEE Electron Device Letters, 24(4): pp 263–265, Apr 2003. 8. Harold Abelson and Peter Andreae.

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