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By Laurel J. Brinton, Minoji Akimoto

The focal point of this conscientiously chosen quantity issues the life, frequency, and kind of composite/complex predicates (the "take a glance" development) in previous sessions of the English language, a space of scholarship which has been nearly overlooked. some of the contributions search to appreciate the collocational and idiomatic points of those constructions, in addition to of similar buildings comparable to complex Read more...

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By Laurel J. Brinton, Minoji Akimoto

The focal point of this conscientiously chosen quantity issues the life, frequency, and kind of composite/complex predicates (the "take a glance" development) in previous sessions of the English language, a space of scholarship which has been nearly overlooked. some of the contributions search to appreciate the collocational and idiomatic points of those constructions, in addition to of similar buildings comparable to complex Read more...

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Cf. cf. cf. cf. cf. cf. cf. cf. 1 presents the results of the foregoing survey of V + deverbal noun collocations in Old English. 114 different composite predicates were found to occur in Old English, consisting of 86 different nouns11 and 5 ‘light’ verbs. 12 By far the most common morphological means of forming the ‘noun of action’ in the composite predicate in Old English is with a Ø affix (55). The second most common morphological ending in the gerundive -ung (11), with -nesse (8), -t / -d (6), and -en / -an (6) following in order of frequency.

And mid micclum gehlyde macodon þa ceaste, …(ÆHom 20 266). ‘and with a great tumult [they] did the quarreling, …’ [et tumultus increscert, … ‘and a tumult increased, …’] (25) wundor macian ‘perform a miracle’ cf. wundrian ‘to wonder at’ and hi ealle sædon þæt se is soð God þe swilce wundra macað, … (ÆLS [Apollinaris] 55–56). ‘and they all said that he is the true God who performs such miracles’ (26) gamen macian ‘make sport’ cf. 25). ] 32 MINOJI AKIMOTO AND LAUREL J. BRINTON (27) fare macian ‘make one’s journey’ cf.

In addition, there is a difference in style among Old English vernacular works and particularly between poetry and prose. Threrefore, not all examples from the Old English corpus are equally good evidence for the existence of an Old English collocation. We will try to cite typical examples on the basis of A Microfiche Concordance to Old English 22 MINOJI AKIMOTO AND LAUREL J. BRINTON (Venezky and Healey 1980), the Dictionary of Old English (Cameron et al. 1986–), An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary (Bosworth and Toller 1898; Toller and Campbell 1921), the Middle English Dictionary (Kurath et al.

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