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By Donald P. Elston, George H. Billingsley, Visit Amazon's Richard A. Young Page, search results, Learn about Author Central, Richard A. Young,

About The Product

Published via the yankee Geophysical Union as a part of the Field journey Guidebooks Series.

The scheduling of the foreign Geological Congress box journeys T-115 and T-315 in the course of the Grand Canyon in the course of the summer season of 1989 has supplied an remarkable chance not just to arrange special river journey logs describing geologic and hydraulic beneficial properties which may be saw from Lees Ferry to Lake Mead, but in addition to bring together a latest precis of Grand Canyon geology. To people strange with information of the geology, it truly is usually meant that no significant difficulties exist as a result of the impressive and vast exposures. One aim of this quantity is to spot and position in viewpoint a number of the salient difficulties that stay

  • Geologic and hydraulic river journey logs (chapters 1 and a pair of) are designed for use in the course of a river journey via Marble Canyon and the Grand Canyon. those logs are through a overview of hydraulic features of the Colorado River (chapter 3). Physiographic, geologic, and structural settings, present in Chapters 4-7, function a basic assessment for the geologist and non-geologist alike.
  • Geologic features of the Early Proterozoic crystalline basement, and of stratified and intrusive rocks of the center and overdue Proterozoic Grand Canyon Supergroup, are summarized in Chapters 8-11.

Of specific curiosity is an interpretation that the overdue Proterozoic Chuar workforce gathered mostly in a lacustrine instead of a marine surroundings of deposition, and that carbonaceous strata of the Chuar team could have served as a possible resource of Precambrian oil. A initial, stratigraphically managed, obvious polar wandering direction built from Proterozoic and Paleozoic rocks of the Grand Canyon and environs is proven in bankruptcy 12; the polar direction and polarity zonation result in correlations with poles pronounced from Proterozoic rocks in other places in North the United States, and the nature of the polar course might mirror the character of flow of the North American plate with recognize to episodes of tectonism.

Content:
Chapter 1 Geologic Log of the Colorado River From Lees Ferry to Temple Bar, Lake Mead, Arizona (pages 1–36): George H. Billingsley and Donald P. Elston
Chapter 2 Hydraulic Log of the Colorado River From Lees Ferry to Diamond Creek, Arizona (pages 37–47): Julia B. Graf, John C. Schmidt and Susan W. Kieffer
Chapter three Hydraulics and Sediment shipping of the Colorado River (pages 48–66): Susan W. Kieffer, Julia B. Graf and John C. Schmidt
Chapter four Physiographic positive factors of Northwestern Arizona (pages 67–71): George H. Billingsley and John D. Hendricks
Chapter five sleek Tectonic surroundings of the Grand Canyon sector, Arizona (pages 72–73): Peter W. Huntoon
Chapter 6 environment of the Precambrian Basement complicated, Grand Canyon, Arizona (pages 74–75): Peter W. Huntoon
Chapter 7 Phanerozoic Tectonism, Grand Canyon, Arizona (pages 76–89): Peter W. Huntoon
Chapter eight Early Proterozoic Rocks of Grand Canyon, Arizona (pages 90–93): Charles W. Barnes
Chapter nine center and overdue Proterozoic Grand Canyon Supergroup, Arizona (pages 94–105): Donald P. Elston
Chapter 10 Petrology and Chemistry of Igneous Rocks Of center Proterozoic Unkar staff, Grand Canyon Supergroup, Northern Arizona (pages 106–116): John D. Hendricks
Chapter eleven capability Petroleum resource Rocks within the past due Proterozoic Chuar team, Grand Canyon, Arizona (pages 117–118): Mitchell W. Reynolds, James G. Palacas and Donald P. Elston
Chapter 12 initial Polar course From Proterozoic and Paleozoic Rocks of the Grand Canyon quarter, Arizona (pages 119–121): Donald P. Elston
Chapter thirteen Paleozoic Strata of the Grand Canyon, Arizona (pages 122–127): Stanley S. Beus and George H. Billingsley
Chapter 14 Cambrian Stratigraphic Nomenclature,Grand Canyon, Arizona ?Mappers Nightmare (pages 128–130): Peter W. Huntoon
Chapter 15 Correlations and Facies alterations in decrease and center Cambrian Tonto workforce, Grand Canyon, Arizona (pages 131–136): Donald P. Elston
Chapter sixteen Mesozoic Strata at Lees Ferry, Arizona (pages 137–138): George H. Billingsley
Chapter 17 Fission?Track relationship: a long time for Cambrian Strata and Laramide and Post?Middle Eocene Cooling occasions From the Grand Canyon, Arizona (pages 139–144): C. W. Naeser, I. R. Duddy, D. P. Elston, T. A. Dumitru and P. F. Green
Chapter 18 improvement of Cenozoic panorama Of significant and northerly Arizona: slicing Of Grand Canyon (pages 145–154): Donald P. Elston and Richard A. Young
Chapter 19 Paleontology, Clast a while, and Paleomagnetism of higher Paleocene and Eocene Gravel and Limestone Deposits, Colorado Plateau and Transition sector, Northern and principal Arizona (pages 155–165): Donald P. Elston, Richard A. younger, Edwin H. Mckee and Michael L. Dennis
Chapter 20 Paleogene?Neogene Deposits of Western Grand Canyon, Arizona (pages 166–174): Richard A. Young
Chapter 21 Pre?Pleistocene(?) Deposits of Aggradation, Lees Ferry to Western Grand Canyon, Arizona (pages 175–185): Donald P. Elston
Chapter 22 Petrology and Geochemistry of overdue Cenozoic Basalt Flows, Western Grand Canyon, Arizona (pages 186–189): J. Godfrey Fitton
Chapter 23 Pleistocene Volcanic Rocks of the Western Grand Canyon, Arizona (pages 190–204): W. Kenneth Hamblin
Chapter 24 Quaternary Terraces in Marble Canyon and japanese Grand Canyon, Arizona (pages 205–211): Michael N. Machette and John N. Rosholt
Chapter 25 Breccia Pipes and linked Mineralization within the Grand Canyon zone, Northern Arizona (pages 212–218): Karen J. Wenrich and Peter W. Huntoon
Chapter 26 Gravity Tectonics, Grand Canyon, Arizona (pages 219–223): Peter W. Huntoon
Chapter 27 Mining task within the Grand Canyon sector, Arizona (pages 224–227): George H. Billingsley
Chapter 28 Bat Cave Guano Mine, Western Grand Canyon, Arizona (page 228): Peter W. Huntoon
Chapter 29 Small Meteorite influence within the Western Grand Canyon, Arizona (page 228): Peter W. Huntoon

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By Donald P. Elston, George H. Billingsley, Visit Amazon's Richard A. Young Page, search results, Learn about Author Central, Richard A. Young,

About The Product

Published via the yankee Geophysical Union as a part of the Field journey Guidebooks Series.

The scheduling of the foreign Geological Congress box journeys T-115 and T-315 in the course of the Grand Canyon in the course of the summer season of 1989 has supplied an remarkable chance not just to arrange special river journey logs describing geologic and hydraulic beneficial properties which may be saw from Lees Ferry to Lake Mead, but in addition to bring together a latest precis of Grand Canyon geology. To people strange with information of the geology, it truly is usually meant that no significant difficulties exist as a result of the impressive and vast exposures. One aim of this quantity is to spot and position in viewpoint a number of the salient difficulties that stay

  • Geologic and hydraulic river journey logs (chapters 1 and a pair of) are designed for use in the course of a river journey via Marble Canyon and the Grand Canyon. those logs are through a overview of hydraulic features of the Colorado River (chapter 3). Physiographic, geologic, and structural settings, present in Chapters 4-7, function a basic assessment for the geologist and non-geologist alike.
  • Geologic features of the Early Proterozoic crystalline basement, and of stratified and intrusive rocks of the center and overdue Proterozoic Grand Canyon Supergroup, are summarized in Chapters 8-11.

Of specific curiosity is an interpretation that the overdue Proterozoic Chuar workforce gathered mostly in a lacustrine instead of a marine surroundings of deposition, and that carbonaceous strata of the Chuar team could have served as a possible resource of Precambrian oil. A initial, stratigraphically managed, obvious polar wandering direction built from Proterozoic and Paleozoic rocks of the Grand Canyon and environs is proven in bankruptcy 12; the polar direction and polarity zonation result in correlations with poles pronounced from Proterozoic rocks in other places in North the United States, and the nature of the polar course might mirror the character of flow of the North American plate with recognize to episodes of tectonism.

Content:
Chapter 1 Geologic Log of the Colorado River From Lees Ferry to Temple Bar, Lake Mead, Arizona (pages 1–36): George H. Billingsley and Donald P. Elston
Chapter 2 Hydraulic Log of the Colorado River From Lees Ferry to Diamond Creek, Arizona (pages 37–47): Julia B. Graf, John C. Schmidt and Susan W. Kieffer
Chapter three Hydraulics and Sediment shipping of the Colorado River (pages 48–66): Susan W. Kieffer, Julia B. Graf and John C. Schmidt
Chapter four Physiographic positive factors of Northwestern Arizona (pages 67–71): George H. Billingsley and John D. Hendricks
Chapter five sleek Tectonic surroundings of the Grand Canyon sector, Arizona (pages 72–73): Peter W. Huntoon
Chapter 6 environment of the Precambrian Basement complicated, Grand Canyon, Arizona (pages 74–75): Peter W. Huntoon
Chapter 7 Phanerozoic Tectonism, Grand Canyon, Arizona (pages 76–89): Peter W. Huntoon
Chapter eight Early Proterozoic Rocks of Grand Canyon, Arizona (pages 90–93): Charles W. Barnes
Chapter nine center and overdue Proterozoic Grand Canyon Supergroup, Arizona (pages 94–105): Donald P. Elston
Chapter 10 Petrology and Chemistry of Igneous Rocks Of center Proterozoic Unkar staff, Grand Canyon Supergroup, Northern Arizona (pages 106–116): John D. Hendricks
Chapter eleven capability Petroleum resource Rocks within the past due Proterozoic Chuar team, Grand Canyon, Arizona (pages 117–118): Mitchell W. Reynolds, James G. Palacas and Donald P. Elston
Chapter 12 initial Polar course From Proterozoic and Paleozoic Rocks of the Grand Canyon quarter, Arizona (pages 119–121): Donald P. Elston
Chapter thirteen Paleozoic Strata of the Grand Canyon, Arizona (pages 122–127): Stanley S. Beus and George H. Billingsley
Chapter 14 Cambrian Stratigraphic Nomenclature,Grand Canyon, Arizona ?Mappers Nightmare (pages 128–130): Peter W. Huntoon
Chapter 15 Correlations and Facies alterations in decrease and center Cambrian Tonto workforce, Grand Canyon, Arizona (pages 131–136): Donald P. Elston
Chapter sixteen Mesozoic Strata at Lees Ferry, Arizona (pages 137–138): George H. Billingsley
Chapter 17 Fission?Track relationship: a long time for Cambrian Strata and Laramide and Post?Middle Eocene Cooling occasions From the Grand Canyon, Arizona (pages 139–144): C. W. Naeser, I. R. Duddy, D. P. Elston, T. A. Dumitru and P. F. Green
Chapter 18 improvement of Cenozoic panorama Of significant and northerly Arizona: slicing Of Grand Canyon (pages 145–154): Donald P. Elston and Richard A. Young
Chapter 19 Paleontology, Clast a while, and Paleomagnetism of higher Paleocene and Eocene Gravel and Limestone Deposits, Colorado Plateau and Transition sector, Northern and principal Arizona (pages 155–165): Donald P. Elston, Richard A. younger, Edwin H. Mckee and Michael L. Dennis
Chapter 20 Paleogene?Neogene Deposits of Western Grand Canyon, Arizona (pages 166–174): Richard A. Young
Chapter 21 Pre?Pleistocene(?) Deposits of Aggradation, Lees Ferry to Western Grand Canyon, Arizona (pages 175–185): Donald P. Elston
Chapter 22 Petrology and Geochemistry of overdue Cenozoic Basalt Flows, Western Grand Canyon, Arizona (pages 186–189): J. Godfrey Fitton
Chapter 23 Pleistocene Volcanic Rocks of the Western Grand Canyon, Arizona (pages 190–204): W. Kenneth Hamblin
Chapter 24 Quaternary Terraces in Marble Canyon and japanese Grand Canyon, Arizona (pages 205–211): Michael N. Machette and John N. Rosholt
Chapter 25 Breccia Pipes and linked Mineralization within the Grand Canyon zone, Northern Arizona (pages 212–218): Karen J. Wenrich and Peter W. Huntoon
Chapter 26 Gravity Tectonics, Grand Canyon, Arizona (pages 219–223): Peter W. Huntoon
Chapter 27 Mining task within the Grand Canyon sector, Arizona (pages 224–227): George H. Billingsley
Chapter 28 Bat Cave Guano Mine, Western Grand Canyon, Arizona (page 228): Peter W. Huntoon
Chapter 29 Small Meteorite influence within the Western Grand Canyon, Arizona (page 228): Peter W. Huntoon

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Additional resources for Geology of Grand Canyon, Northern Arizona (With Colorado River Guides): Lee Ferry to Pierce Ferry, Arizona

Sample text

This fold, and the next fold just downstream (fig. 28), are part of the Monument fault system. 7 m). Tapeats Sandstone, draped over the fault, dips upstream. Vishnu Schist exposed at river level downstream. 6) Royal Arch Creek (Elves Chasm), on left, is cut through a deposit of travertine that extends from the Tapeats Sandstone near river level to the top of the Muav Limestone. View of complete section of Cambrian Tonto Group and overlying strata up and including the Redwall Limestone in amphitheater to the west of Elves Chasm and a curious channel-like feature can be seen at about the level of the Temple Butte Limestone (Fonnation) in the back of the amphitheater.

View downstream of tilted cliff-forming Shinumo Quartzite (Unkar Group) unconformably overlain by basal Paleozoic strata (fig. 27). 4 m) drop. 6 kIn) above Bass Camp; Bass Limestone (Unkar Group) appears beneath Cambrian Tapeats Sandstone on right, then on left View down river to Vishnu Schist overlain by Bass Limestone that is in turn intruded by diabase sill in middle distance and on left; light colored rocks are thennally altered and bleached Bass Limestone. Above the bleached zone are ledges of the upper Bass Limestone, slope-forming red Hakatai Shale, and cliff-forming Shinumo Quartzite (extending to top of third cliff, characterized by smooth face and capped with uppennost quartzite bed of Shinumo).

The cave contains Pleistocene giant-sloth dung deposits, 11,000 to more than 40,000 years old. 7) Muddy Creek Formation (late Miocene) accumulated against Cambrian to Mississippian strata along the Grand Wash Cliffs to an average elevation of about 3,600 feet (1,100 m), approximately 2,400 feet (730 m) above lake level. The base of the Muddy Creek lies at at an unkown depth below this part of Lake Mead. cut into the Grand Wash Cliffs, including an older tributary canyon that the present Colorado river occupies seen on the right and higher up on the walls of the Grand Wash Cliffs behind us.

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