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By J. A. MANGAN

A set of essays exploring the connection among activity and warfare, bringing jointly verified authors that come with Peter Beck, Hans Bonde, J.A. Mangan and Gertrud Pfister, and rising authors reminiscent of Penelope Kissoudi, Orestis Kustrin, Callum McKenzie and Roberta Vescovi.

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By J. A. MANGAN

A set of essays exploring the connection among activity and warfare, bringing jointly verified authors that come with Peter Beck, Hans Bonde, J.A. Mangan and Gertrud Pfister, and rising authors reminiscent of Penelope Kissoudi, Orestis Kustrin, Callum McKenzie and Roberta Vescovi.

Show description

Read or Download Militarism, Sport, Europe: War Without Weapons (The European Sports History Review, Volume 5) PDF

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Extra resources for Militarism, Sport, Europe: War Without Weapons (The European Sports History Review, Volume 5)

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Certainly many gladiators survived the arena to freedom and to retirement. Discussions of gladiators’ chances of survival include Ville, La Gladiature en Occident, pp. 318–25; Wiedemann, Emperors and Gladiators, pp. 119–22; Kyle, pp. 85–6; Junkelmann, pp. 69–70. 28 FROM THE BATTLEFIELD TO THE ARENA 60 . Cicero Phil. 74, a metaphorical use of gladiatorial retirement; see Ville, La Gladiature en Occident, pp. 325–9. 61 . ), History and Social Anthropology (London: Tavistock Publications, 1986), pp.

Müller certainly did not agree with politicizing education, which after 1815 had increased in the universities. 32 Just as in Plato’s view, philosophers were responsible for leadership in culture and education, the same was true in Müller’s view of his contemporary universities and academics. For him the university was a place to realize self-knowledge and a preparation for all later decisions and opinions. He did not endorse the idea of a university as a breeding ground for revolutionary political ideas.

Cicero Phil. 74, a metaphorical use of gladiatorial retirement; see Ville, La Gladiature en Occident, pp. 325–9. 61 . ), History and Social Anthropology (London: Tavistock Publications, 1986), pp. 63–79. Usually applied to political and administrative changes as societies make the transition to a market economy, the pattern of ‘the institutionalization of spheres of conduct which had previously been relatively undifferentiated’ can be applied to gladiators. Similarly, early cooks had the status of the lowest slaves but in the second century BC they came to acquire prestige.

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