Download Racial Attitudes and Asian Pacific Americans: Demystifying by Karen K Inkelas PDF

By Karen K Inkelas

Show description

By Karen K Inkelas

Show description

Read or Download Racial Attitudes and Asian Pacific Americans: Demystifying the Model Minority (Studies in Asian Americans: Reconceptualizing Culture, History, Politics) PDF

Best history_1 books

Imperialisms: Historical and Literary Investigations, 1500-1900

Filling a big hole in old, literary, and post-colonial scholarship, Imperialisms examines early identification statements and nuances of dominance of the world's significant imperialisms in a number of theatres of festival. constructed in collaboration with best students within the box, this e-book balances historic essays and case stories, and encourages investigations of conversant and competing imperialisms, their practices, and their rhetoric of self-justification.

Additional resources for Racial Attitudes and Asian Pacific Americans: Demystifying the Model Minority (Studies in Asian Americans: Reconceptualizing Culture, History, Politics)

Sample text

Because of these strong linkages, this study will test both the self-interest and dominant ideology theories as potential influences on Asian Pacific American students’ racial attitudes. INFLUENCES ON RACIAL ATTITUDES UNIQUE TO ASIAN PACIFIC AMERICANS Thus far, most of the research and theory reviewed has not focused on Asian Pacific Americans specifically, but on the racial attitudes of Whites or Americans in general. This choice was due in large part to the fact that very little has been written about Asian Pacific Americans’ racial attitudes (Osajima, 1991) and educational experiences (Yonezawa & Antonio, 1996).

However, a much smaller percentage of Asian Americans in the national sample thought that no special consideration should be given to African Americans in admissions decisions (29 percent). Similarly, Fukurai, et al. (1995), in a survey of 266 students at the University of California at Santa Cruz, found that Asian Americans tended to oppose certain aspects of affirmative action policies, but supported other manifestations of the policy. For example, 38 percent of APA students in the sample felt that affirmative action was a form of discrimination (as opposed to eight percent of Hispanics and none of the African Americans in the study).

Weidman’s model encompasses several sources of influence on students’ outcomes, including familial and other non-college reference groups. Weidman (1989) emphasizes that the effects of parental socialization may persist during a student’s years in college and thus may mitigate the impact that college can have on affecting students’ outcomes. He suggests that familial socialization and lifestyles be investigated, both as a direct influence on student outcomes and in interaction with the collegiate experience.

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.73 of 5 – based on 13 votes