Download Talking Hawai'i's Story: Oral Histories of an Island People by Michi Kodama-Nishimoto, Warren S. Nishimoto, Cynthia A. PDF

By Michi Kodama-Nishimoto, Warren S. Nishimoto, Cynthia A. Oshiro

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By Michi Kodama-Nishimoto, Warren S. Nishimoto, Cynthia A. Oshiro

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Extra info for Talking Hawai'i's Story: Oral Histories of an Island People (Biography Monograph)

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Japanese name. If you own land, you go hire somebody, you the one boss. Of Spanish and Filipino ancestry, Severo Dinson was born on the island of Cebu, Philippines in 1904. His parents were subsistence farmers. Dinson came to Hawai‘i in 1922 to work on Hawai‘i Island’s sugar plantations. In 1924–1925, Filipino workers conducted a territory-wide sugar plantation strike. On Hawai‘i Island, strike camps were set up in Hilo for strikers and their families. In January 1925, strikers marched towards ‘Öla‘a Plantation in a bid to recruit nonstrikers, but were turned away by police.

Pretty soon, we get a whole pile of people. Like maybe over 50, 100 people in the whole park. And my brother Arthur and Joe Kahaulelio and them, [they] teach all the tourists to dance the hula. Well, of course, then we tell, “Oh, but you gotta wear a lei. ” So, they go to our little corner wagon we had there. And they buy the (chuckles) plumeria lei, put on the lei, just so they could dance over there in the park. During all those war years, I worked, chee, as an usherette at the old Princess Theater.

Then from there, they had a launch that connected to Ford Island. Because we worked on Ford Island, we had to catch the ferry or the launch. So what we did was, as soon as class was over, catch the bus—and at that time, it was those trolley buses—we’d catch the bus and get off at the Black Cat Cafe. Across the Army-Navy Y[MCA], they had the Black Cat Cafe. And then, get a hamburger and milkshake, or whatever, and run across the street for the Pearl Harbor bus. We’d catch that bus and go to work, and we’d get there just in time to catch the launch.

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